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wrought iron balusters

 

Replacing Half Wall with Wrought Iron Balusters | Home Improvement | Home Decor | Home Renovation | Home DIY

I am not sure why but finding someone to replace my half wall with balusters was one of the harder task so far. For some reason, I have the hardest time finding the right people to do the job. Can anyone else relate?

Although you can find me doing many home improvement projects, I was not confident enough to tackle this one. I was mostly concerned with the banister being stable. So I searched, interviewed, was stood up and a’last I found the right company for the job :).

 

wrought iron balusters

BEFORE




wrought iron balusters

AFTER

 

If you’re in the Houston area, here are the highly recommended details:

Company: Precision Stair Company, Houston

Job: The job included replacing the half wall with balusters, patching any wholes made with drywall, putty, and texture, and paint. Staining existing railing to match new rail.

Time Frame:  3 days, including time for putty and paint to dry

Cost: $1600.00

If you’re thinking of bypassing the cost and attempting this on your own, there were a few things that I picked up while watching the guys complete the job.

wrought iron balusters

Before: That top base board of the half wall was used as the bottom base that holds the iron posts. How efficient!

 

wrought iron balusters

After: The base board moved to the bottom and a support post installed. It was explained that it is federal regulation to install a deep seated post for ever so many balusters or feet. This supports the weight and length of the railing

 

Well, that’s all I have. Here are more pictures of the job through completion.

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18 Comments. Leave new

  • Did the $1600 include labor and materials?

    Reply
  • Thanks for your response. The railings look lovely – I just need to find someone in the Tampa, FL area to do this job!

    Reply
  • Very Nice! I love your paint color as well! What color is that? The Grey?

    Reply
  • Hi! Your railing looks beautiful. I am in Dallas and looking to do something similar. Would you mind telling us how many linear feet of railing that ended up being?

    Reply
    • I_AM_Angela_East
      October 20, 2017 5:54 pm

      Hi Lisa. I thought I responded to this weeks ago. Apparently my phone didn’t submit the response :(. Anyway, thank you for stopping by and the warm comment. Our railing is apprx 13ft. I watch as the pieced together to rails to make this whole piece. Hope this helps. Have a good weekend.

      Reply
  • That looks amazing! I need to find someone to do this in Utah. I have found people who will do the iron and some that will do wood. Only found one company willing to do both the wood cap and wrought iron spindles but they will not do the tear out or the prep for the new railing… Ugh.. So difficult. Thanks for the images and quote. Gives us hope that we can find someone.

    Reply
  • Am I seeing this correctly? Did they tear out and install the railing before fixing the drywall? Looks like the only thing they did between tear out and installation was install a base plate of wood to mount the railing to. Is that correct?

    Reply
    • Angela East
      June 20, 2018 5:16 am

      Hi Jason, they repaired the drywall before installing the railing. I’ve written out the steps below in more details as I remembered them:
      1. Carefully cut out the drywall and frame from the half wall leaving the base of the frame in tact on the floor.
      2. Set the top plate aside to be used later.
      3. Install drywall to patch holes.
      4. Attach the spared top plate to the frame that was left on the floor. Since it was the same size, it serves perfectly as the base plate now. You may also have to add baseboards where the wall was cut out.
      5. Install the support post/baluster. This is installed deep into the floor and provides the main support for the rail system.
      6. Install the handrail, attaching it to the wall securely.
      7. Install the remaining balusters.
      8. Stain hand rails
      9. Finish drywall repair (mud and sand)
      10. Paint walls.

      I hope this breakdown was helpful. Have a good day.

      Reply
  • Getting a stair lift can be a big step in any home. When you decide to invest in one, it can open up a whole new world, the upstairs. I know when my grandma got a lift put in her home, she was so excited, she didn’t come back downstairs for 3 days.

    Reply
  • Is this available for Austin Location ?

    Reply
    • Angela East
      July 14, 2019 2:57 pm

      Hmm.. You may be able to find a stair professional to do this for you there for pretty inexpensive.

      Reply

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